Posts Tagged "Collaborate"

Collaborate: Family + Church (A Synopsis of Chapters 28 – 35)

Over the last several days, I have posted a number of articles on the new book Collaborate: Family + Church. This represents the next entry in that series. Earlier entries include:

28. Dr. Rob Rienow – “Building a Theology of Family Ministry”

Summary: Rob Rienow starts this chapter with the premise that family ministry is not something the church should embrace because it is the newest fad or even because it works.  He asserts that churches should adopt a family ministry approach based on a review of Biblical theology.  The point of this chapter is to demonstrate that family ministry should be built on the “inerrancy and sufficiency of scripture” and that the Great Commission is fundamentally based on the concept of family.  He then proceeds to work through both the Old and New Testaments to support 3 basic and foundational principals as follows (and I quote them from the article as I couldn’t phrase them any better):

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Collaborate: Family + Church (A Synopsis of Chapters 19 – 27)

Over the last several days, I have posted a number of articles on the new book Collaborate: Family + Church. This represents the next entry in that series. Earlier entries include:

19. Kenny Conley – “Reinventing Baptism”

Summary: Kenny Conley’s article provides interesting insights into what his church is doing in the area of baptism to get families more involved in the spiritual development of their children.  Kenny notes that the best chance a child has at long-term spiritual growth is when the parent takes a leadership role in that process.

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Collaborate: Family + Church (A Synopsis of Chapters 10 – 18)

Over the last several days, I have posted a number of articles on the new book Collaborate: Family + Church. This represents the next entry in that series. Earlier entries include:

10. Gina McClain – “I Hate Homework!”

Summary: Gina McClain argues that our job in children’s ministry is to help parents develop a vision for their children.  If parents do not have a godly vision for their children, it will not matter how many tools and resources we give them to help them lead their children spiritually.  Without a vision, such tools and resources will often go unused.

Gina explains that when parents do not intentionally develop a vision for their kids, they will inevitably adopt the vision the culture holds for their kids.  She explains that the vision that today’s culture has for kids is what she calls the “well-rounded child.”  This can alternately be called the “self-focused” child.  This child believes that the world and everything in it exists for their personal benefit.  To combat this, parents must develop a God-sized vision for their kids that teaches them to focus on God rather than themselves.

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Collaborate: Family + Church (A Synopsis of Chapters 1 – 9)

Yesterday, I started my review of the book Collaborate: Family + Church. Starting today, I will be providing a brief chapter-by-chapter synopsis of the book along with my thought, favorite quote(s) from the chapter and a brief biography of the author.

1. Michael Chanley – “Rising Tide”

Summary: This chapter serves as an introduction to family ministry in general and this book specifically.  Michael Chanley has done us all great service in pulling this collaborative effort together, and we owe him a debt of gratitude.

Quote: “…how do we get parents to become the primary spiritual voices in their children’s lives, and use the 3,000 hours they have with their kids rather than relying on the 40 hours we have them at church?”

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A Review of Collaborate: Family + Church

Rarely have I ever come across a book which was surrounded by so much anticipated and delivered on that anticipation in such a big way when it finally arrived.  Collaborate: Family + Church delivered on those high expectations and actually far exceeded them.  Collaborate is not so much a traditional book as is a collection of articles from leaders in the fields of children’s and youth ministry.  The book is focused primarily on the idea of the orange concept which maintains that the family working together with the church is the most effective way to reach and disciple children for the kingdom of Christ.

The list of authors of this book reads like a who’s who of children’s ministry in the world today, and though I know that many of them would humbly object to such a title, these really are the cream of the crop in terms of role models and visionaries in children’s ministry.  The articles offer a plethora of thought provoking ideas, practical advice, and convicting insights.   Whether it is an article on parenting by Jim Wideman, an article on getting along with your senior pastor, advice on baptism from Kenny Conley, or advice on being a hospitable pastor’s wife from Joyce Oglesby, this books offers something from everyone.  There were certainly chapters which resonated more with me like the offerings from Jim Wideman, Sam Luce, Kenny Conley, Fred Stocker, Gina McClain, Dick Gruber, Rob Rienow and Yancy Richmond.  These resonated because they touched something that God has already laid on my heart and/or laid something on my heart through the chapter.  In most instances, these articles resonated with me as both a father and a children’s ministry worker which amplified their impact on me.

I also thoroughly enjoyed reading the personal account of the creation of Seeds Family Worship from Jason Houser and the explanations from Rob Bradbury and Roger Fields have found success in children’s ministry through Planet Shakers and KidzBlitz!  I learned from the practical insight of personal experience shared in chapters by Anna Light, Brad Tate, Brian Vander Ark, Jeremy Hall, and Justyn Smith.  I appreciated the vision reflected in the articles by Jonathan Cliff, Reggie Joiner, Brian Haynes and Matt McKee.  I can honestly say that there was not one chapter in this book that I did not walk away with something from.

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