DON’T HUG A GRUDGE by Donna Perugini (A Dad in the Middle Review)

Introduction

In the February installment of The Children’s Ministry Blog Patrol (February 2010), I featured an article from the blog of Donna Perugini.  That lead a brief exchange via e-mail in which she mentioned that she had written several children’s books.  She was kind enough to send me a free copy of one of her books titled “Don’t Hug a Grudge” for me to review for Dad in the Middle.

About the Author

Before jumping into the book, I like to know a little bit about the author.  Ms. Perugini’s blog indicates that she taught children the Word of God over 30 years.  Her blog indicates that her approach to teaching the Bible included “cutting it into bite-sized pieces and making it fun and entertaining.” In addition to Don’t Hug A Grudge, she has authored three other children’s books.  They include:

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Our Home Is Like A Little Church (A Review)

This book originally published by Sojourn Community Church, in Louisville, Kentucky, was written by Lindsay Blair and Bobby Giles and illustrated by Tessa James.  It was originally published under the title “Pastor Daddy,” but has since been picked up by Christian Focus Publications and republished under it’s new name Our Home Is Like A Little Church.

In the introduction to the book Jared Kennedy, the Children’s Minister at Sojourn Community Church writes,

“God intended the home to be the front line of ministry to children – not the Sunday school or public church gathering alone.  The church and the home are partners.”

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Collaborate: Family + Church (A Synopsis of Chapters 28 – 35)

Over the last several days, I have posted a number of articles on the new book Collaborate: Family + Church. This represents the next entry in that series. Earlier entries include:

28. Dr. Rob Rienow – “Building a Theology of Family Ministry”

Summary: Rob Rienow starts this chapter with the premise that family ministry is not something the church should embrace because it is the newest fad or even because it works.  He asserts that churches should adopt a family ministry approach based on a review of Biblical theology.  The point of this chapter is to demonstrate that family ministry should be built on the “inerrancy and sufficiency of scripture” and that the Great Commission is fundamentally based on the concept of family.  He then proceeds to work through both the Old and New Testaments to support 3 basic and foundational principals as follows (and I quote them from the article as I couldn’t phrase them any better):

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Collaborate: Family + Church (A Synopsis of Chapters 19 – 27)

Over the last several days, I have posted a number of articles on the new book Collaborate: Family + Church. This represents the next entry in that series. Earlier entries include:

19. Kenny Conley – “Reinventing Baptism”

Summary: Kenny Conley’s article provides interesting insights into what his church is doing in the area of baptism to get families more involved in the spiritual development of their children.  Kenny notes that the best chance a child has at long-term spiritual growth is when the parent takes a leadership role in that process.

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Collaborate: Family + Church (A Synopsis of Chapters 10 – 18)

Over the last several days, I have posted a number of articles on the new book Collaborate: Family + Church. This represents the next entry in that series. Earlier entries include:

10. Gina McClain – “I Hate Homework!”

Summary: Gina McClain argues that our job in children’s ministry is to help parents develop a vision for their children.  If parents do not have a godly vision for their children, it will not matter how many tools and resources we give them to help them lead their children spiritually.  Without a vision, such tools and resources will often go unused.

Gina explains that when parents do not intentionally develop a vision for their kids, they will inevitably adopt the vision the culture holds for their kids.  She explains that the vision that today’s culture has for kids is what she calls the “well-rounded child.”  This can alternately be called the “self-focused” child.  This child believes that the world and everything in it exists for their personal benefit.  To combat this, parents must develop a God-sized vision for their kids that teaches them to focus on God rather than themselves.

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My 2010 Reading List

Inspired by Kenny Conley (as always), and his post “My 2010 Reading List,” I thought I would put together my own reading list for 2010.  I love to read, but I tend to go through stages throughout the year.  There are months where all I read is my Bible, and there are period where I read insatiably.  I usually have many books going at the same time. I hope to accomplish two things by posting it here:

  1. It will help me to organize my thoughts and have a plan for what I intend to read; and
  2. I hope it will help to ease my wife’s concern that I continue to buy tons and tons of books and never read them.  See, honey, I have a plan!

So, here is what I plan to be reading in 2010:

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